WRITING

State of emergency: COVID highlights hospitals’ mental health crisis, October 2020

Safer coalmines, happier, healthier and more engaged canaries, June 2020

Safer coalmines, happier, healthier and more engaged canaries

John Bonning Corresponding Author E-mail address: president@acem.org.au ACEM Board, Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Council of Advocacy, Practice and Partnerships, Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Emergency Department, Waikato Hospital, Hamilton, New Zealand Correspondence: Dr John Bonning, Australasian College for Emergency Medicine, 34 Jeffcott Street, West Melbourne, VIC 3003, Australia.

The Leadership role of Emergency Directors, May 7, 2020

The Leadership Role of Emergency Directors – NoWEM

I remember day one of internship as if it was yesterday. There I was, proud but apprehensive. Only slightly more comfortable in my new clothes than my new role. There were more firsts to come. First day as a trainee, first night in-charge of ED, and eventually my first shift as a consultant.

Racism goes viral, February 15, 2020

Racism goes viral | Coronavirus and xenophobia | onthewards

A patient refusing to shake their surgeon’s hand. An emergency physician asked to wear a mask. Members of the public presenting to ED requesting viral swabs because they sat next to a man of ‘Asian appearance’ on the bus.

Re-Imagining Emergency Departments in NSW, February 7, 2020

Re-Imagining Emergency Departments in NSW

ASMOF member and emergency physician Dr Clare Skinner has written an excellent article in Croakey on her vision to improve Emergency departments across NSW. (reproduced with permission) Emergency Departments (EDs) are doing it tough. A recent series of articles published by Croakey have described problems experienced by patients, carers and clinicians, and proposed some potential solutions.

At a time of looming crisis, a vision for health system transformation, January 29, 2020

At a time of looming crisis, a vision for health system transformation

Introduction by Croakey: If large numbers of Australians require urgent hospital treatment for the novel coronavirus, how will the system cope? With great difficulty, one would assume, given the widespread concerns raised in recent months at Croakey about the pressures on Emergency Departments.

Bushfire Sun, January 7, 2020

Bushfire sun – onthewards Medical Podcast & Blog

It’s summer in Australia and the country is on fire. My news feed is ablaze – tragic photos of charred houses, desperate wildlife and families sheltering on the beach. The air in Sydney is smoky and thick, transforming the sun into an iridescent crimson disc. On Saturday, the temperature reached forty five degrees.

Working with the ED Admitting Officer, December 24, 2019

Working with the ED Admitting Officer * LITFL * SMILE2

I met Laurence over the phone on my first day as a consultant emergency physician. I was in charge that day. My impostor syndrome was out of control and so was the department. I was cajoling a group of doctors and nurses I barely knew through the afternoon round when the ‘batphone’ rang.

My first day – reflecting on a role model (page 48), December 2019

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Changing Minds – reflections of a Mental Health Champion, December 11, 2019

ACEM – Changing Minds

I’ve always had an interest in the way people think, and a broader interest in systems and society, as I suppose many emergency physicians do. There are mental health professionals in my family. My great-grandfather was the medical superintendent at the Peat Island Asylum, on the Hawkesbury River just north of Sydney, in the 1950s and ’60s.

Gender inequity in medicine and medical leadership, November, 2019

Gender inequity in medicine and medical leadership

To the Editor: Last month, the Medical Journal of Australia called for manuscript submissions on the topic of “Women in medicine and medical leadership in Australia – is there gender equity?” We answer with a resounding no. Indeed, we believe the question itself perpetuates gender disparity by suggesting that the answer is up for debate.

Interdependence, September 11, 2019

Interdependence a Tale from the Wards | Hospital Teamwork | onthewards

Once upon a time – more years ago than I care to own up to – I was a freshly minted doctor. A newbie. I was pleased with myself because I survived the first day of internship, although the taupe-coloured trousers I had worn to work hadn’t fared quite so well.

How to ace a consultant interview, June 24, 2019

How to ace a consultant interview * LITFL * SMILE2

A few weeks ago, I was idly scrolling through Twitter, when a post by a friend popped up. Sitting mentally preparing for a job interview. It’s a good anxiety. A challenge to perform. Any coaching from the Twittersphere? She had captured my attention.

ED Entomology: A tale from the Resus Room, May 9, 2019

ED Entomology: A tale from the Resus Room

At last week’s Winter Symposium in Rotorua, New Zealand, FACEM Dr Clare Skinner shared her personal journey in emergency medicine and what she has relied on to not just survive but thrive. These are her words. I’m going to tell you a story.

IProfile #35 – Dr Clare Alice Skinner – Inspiring Doctors blog, February 4, 2019

Inspiring Doctors

Profile # 35 – Dr. Clare Alice Skinner Specialty: Emergency Medicine (with lots of Medical Administration and Medical Education thrown in) Current practice: Director of Emergency Medicine, Hornsby…

Put your hands up, January 29, 2019

Put your hands up – NoWEM

Hi everyone – my name is Clare Skinner and I’m the Director of an Emergency Department. I consider myself incredibly lucky. I absolutely love my job. For me, there is so much personal and professional satisfaction in leading a team of fantastically clever and committed clinicians.

Burning out, March 12, 2018

Burning Out

Do you ever feel that everyone seems to have amazing coping skills yet you seem to be the only one who struggles with even the most basic aspects of “adulting”? Why does everyone else seem to live this perfect life and achieve so much, yet make it seem like it’s no big deal?

A large-scale mass casualty simulation to develop the non-technical skills medical students require for collaborative teamwork, March 8, 2016

A large-scale mass casualty simulation to develop the non-technical skills medical students require for collaborative teamwork – PubMed

A large class teaching activity, framed as a simulation of a natural disaster is an acceptable and effective activity for medical students to develop the non-technical skills of collaboration, negotiation and communication, which are essential to team working. The design could be of value in medical …

A values-based health system, March 7, 2011

A values-based health system

A new paradigm for health care It remains debatable that the Rudd government’s health care reform solutions were revolutionary. The collective proposals fell short of addressing the fundamental causes of health system failure.

What should we make of the MyHospitals website, December 16, 2010

What should we make of the MyHospitals website?

In health policy, it is rare to find an initiative that is universally blessed. This is partly because health policy is frequently about finding the “least worst option”, there being few measures that don’t have some downside. It also reflects the “strife of interests” that so often drown out reasonable intentions.

How hospital emergency departments are forced to “sell” patients, May 4, 2010

How hospital emergency departments are forced to “sell” patients

(Part 3 of a Croakey series on health reform). Cost-shifting, blame-shifting and patient-shifting are an integral part of our health system, and the COAG health reforms are unlikely to signal their demise. Dr Clare Skinner, an emergency registrar in Sydney, has some insights from the frontline about how emergency departments “sell” patients, and questions the impact on patient care.

The ethical minefield of bringing back the dead, February 16, 2010

The ethical minefield of bringing back the dead

A friend and I, the other day, happened upon a heavily tattooed man. ”Would you ever get a tattoo?” I asked my friend. ”Eww, no!” he responded. ”I just can’t imagine anything that I would still want marked on my body when I am 80 years old.

Reforming New South Wales public hospitals: An assessment of the Garling inquiry, January 19, 2009

Reforming New South Wales public hospitals: an assessment of the Garling inquiry

The final report of the Special Commission of Inquiry into Acute Care Services in NSW Public Hospitals was published on 27 November 2008. 1 The Inquiry was initiated after two highly publicised incidents at Sydney’s Royal North Shore Hospital: the death of 16-year-old Vanessa Anderson following a head injury inflicted by a golf ball; 2 and Jana Horska’s miscarriage in the emergency department toilets.

Finding the fix for broke Emergency wards, December 9, 2008

Finding The Fix For Broke Emergency Wards – New Matilda

The much anticipated final report of the Special Commission of Inquiry into Acute Care Services in NSW Public Hospitals was published on 27 November, and it makes interesting reading.

It’s make or break time for public hospitals, November 27, 2008

It’s Make Or Break Time For Public Hospitals – New Matilda

It is three years since Vanessa Anderson presented to the emergency department at Royal North Shore Hospital with head injuries sustained from a golf ball. Last year, Jana Horska’s tragic miscarriage in the waiting room toilets kept the large Sydney hospital in the media spotlight.

No-one runs hospitals: John Menadue at Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators meeting, February 21, 2008

No-one runs hospitals: John Menadue at RACMA meeting – Centre for Policy Development

Addressing the inefficiencies and inequities of our health system requires system change, rather than just more money. In this presentation to the the February 2008 meeting of the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators, CPD Chair John Menadue addressed the fundamental structural conflict between clinical and corporate governance in our hospitals and suggested ways we can move towards solutions which achieve both medical and organisational excellence.

Inside the emergency department, December 3, 2007

Inside the emergency department

Emergency departments are under pressure. Chronic staff shortages, access block and other problems are increasingly affecting the ability of medical and nursing staff to treat patients On 23 September 2007, The Age (Melbourne) reported a leaked letter to the Victorian Health Minister from Dr Andrew Buck, an emergency registrar, who described compromised patient care in the overcrowded and understaffed emergency department (ED) at Monash Medical Centre in Melbourne.

Re-inventing medical work and training: a view from generation X, July 3, 2006

Re-inventing medical work and training: a view from generation X

Australia’s health system is under pressure. Demand for health services is rising as the population ages and the burden of chronic disease grows. There is a mismatch between community expectations and health service delivery, fuelled by intense media scrutiny and political point-scoring. Medical technologies are becoming more complex, resulting in increasingly specialised and expensive medical care.

Hospitals must change to staunch flow of staff, October 14, 2005

Hospitals must change to staunch flow of staff

THE rising use of casual doctors reflects the workforce shortage facing the health system, with chronic vacancies across the system.

The challenge of locum working arrangements in New South Wales public hospitals, 2005

The challenge of locum working arrangements in New South Wales public hospitals

The use of locum medical officers to fill resident and registrar shifts in the New South Wales public hospital system has increased markedly in recent years. 1 Doctors providing locum services to hospitals include recent medical graduates, specialist trainees, and experienced clinicians who have worked previously in the hospital system as career medical officers.